Tag Archives: chicken

Moroccan-Spiced Chicken One-Pot

A low-fat, high protein (52.2g per serving) and moderate calorie main meal, perfect for the summer and packing a punch with spices and flavour!

Serves 1

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 chicken breast, cut into chunks
  • 50g dried couscous
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, diced
  • 150ml water or chicken stock
  • 80g cooked peas
  • 1 carrot, thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 bunch fresh mint

METHOD:

  1. Heat the olive oil on a high heat.
  2. Sear the chicken so there is no pink around the outside, and continue to cook for a further 3 minutes.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium, and add the onions and cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Add the spices, garlic and carrots, and cook for a further 4minutes until the carrots are slightly soft.
  5. Remove from the heat and add the stock or boiled water, the peas and the couscous. Combine well.
  6. Leave for 5 minutes, until the couscous has expanded and is soft and fluffy.
  7. Add fresh mint to serve.
  8. Enjoy!

NUTRITION

Screen Shot 2018-05-10 at 13.00.02.png

YES LADS LOOK AT ALL THAT GREEN!

Chicken – a low-fat source of protein which is high in the vitamins thiamin, riboflavin and niacin for energy production; and zinc for enzyme function, immune control and protein synthesis.

Couscous – high in protein (6g per portion) and providing a good base for this dish.

Peas – providing potassium, vitamin B6 for energy and dietary fibre for bowel moment.

Carrots – High in retinol for vision, thiamin for energy release from carbohydrates and neurotransmitter synthesis, fibre for digestion, vitamin C for immune and antioxidant function, and potassium.

 

Sweet and Sour Chicken

I was SO PROUD of this meal, I have never made my own sweet and sour sauce before and let’s just say I will be making it again! Nutritious and delicious!

Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 chicken breasts, chopped into chunks
  • 1 pineapple, flesh removed and chopped into pieces
  • 5 tbsp ketchup or tomato puree
  • 3 tbsp malt vinegar
  • 2 tbsp demerara sugar
  • 200g sugar snap peas
  • 1 red pepper, deseeded and chopped
  • 1 green pepper, deseeded and chopped
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 100g basmati rice
  • 300g water, boiled

METHOD

  1. Heat the olive oil in a pan and gently fry on a medium heat until soft. Meanwhile, combine the chicken, ketchup, vinegar and sugar.
  2. Add the chicken mixture to the pan and turn up to a high heat to sear the chicken, reduce to a medium heat and cook for 10 minutes.
  3. In a separate pan, boil the rice with the water, and then reduce to a simmer and cook for 10minutes.
  4. Add the peppers, garlic, peas and the pineapple to the chicken and cook for a further 5 minutes until the pineapple is hot and the chicken is cooked through.
  5. Serve and enjoy!

NUTRITION

Screen Shot 2018-04-24 at 13.54.28.png

Chicken – a low-fat source of protein which is high in the vitamins thiamin, riboflavin and niacin for energy production; and zinc for enzyme function, immune control and protein synthesis.

Pineapple – an amazing source of vitamin C for protein and neurotransmitter synthesis, and manganese for protein formation and calcium absorption. It is also high in fibre for digestion.

Vegetables – this meal provides 3+ of your 5-a-day, giving you loads of vitamins and minerals!

Rice – a good source of carbohydrate, which is also low in fat and forms a energy-giving base for the rest of the meal.

Chicken and Chickpea Protein Curry

This recipe uses chickpeas instead of a carbohydrate base, so is perfect for getting that protein in for muscle production. For a vegetarian alternative, substitute the chicken for rice or naan; or you could swap out one can of chickpeas for the carbohydrates if you think you need more nutrients for energy!

Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

  • 250g chicken breast, diced
  • 2 cans chickpeas, drained
  • 1 large white onion, chopped
  • 1 tsp garlic, chopped
  • 1 tsp ginger, mushed
  • 2 tbsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 can chopped tomatoes
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 bunch fresh coriander
  • 1 tsp olive oil

METHOD

  1. Heat olive oil in a large pan and add onion, cooking until soft.
  2. Add chicken breast and, whilst stirring, cook for 10-15 minutes or until the chicken is mostly white all the way through.
  3. Add the garlic and ginger and fry for another 2 minutes.
  4. Add garam masala, turmeric, salt and pepper and combine.
  5. Add the tomatoes and chickpeas, and again stir to combine and heat through.
  6. Cover with a lid and turn to a low heat, cook for another 5-10 minutes.
  7. Remove the lid and mix in the coriander and lemon juice until the coriander has wilted.
  8. Enjoy!

NUTRITION

Screen Shot 2018-04-13 at 12.51.56.png

Chicken – a low-fat source of protein which is high in the vitamins thiamin, riboflavin and niacin for energy production; and zinc for enzyme function, immune control and protein synthesis.

Tomatoes – massively high in vitamin C for protein and neurotransmitter synthesis; it also has functions in detoxification and as an antioxidant. It also gives you vitamin A for vision and immune function, and potassium for fluid balance and muscle contraction.

Chickpeas – a plant-based protein source and a brilliant base if wanting a low-carb meal; chickpeas provide 36g of protein in addition to the 55g from the chicken. They are also high in iron for oxygen transport, immune and vitamin C function; folate for DNA synthesis and cell production; and dietary fibre for digestion.

 

Sweet Potato Chicken Hotpot

This simple but delicious recipe fills you up and will use any leftover chicken you don’t want to waste!

Leftover roast potatoes can also be used to top the hotpot, just bake in the oven for a little less time!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 onion
  • 10g flour
  • 300ml water or chicken stock
  • 100g cooked chicken
  • Teaspoon of olive oil
  • 1 medium-sized sweet potato
  • Pinch of nutmeg
  • Veg – I used broccoli and sweetcorn but any mixed veg will work!

METHOD

  1. Heat oven to 200C/180CF/6
  2. Chop onion and cook on a low heat with the olive oil in a saucepan until soft, or for around 5 minutes.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat and mix in the flour.
  4. Return the pan to the heat and stir to cook the flour for 1-2 minutes.
  5. Slowly add the water or chicken stock and, once added, season with pepper and a pinch of nutmeg.
  6. Bring the boil and keep stirring until the mixture thickens slightly.
  7. Stir in the cooked chicken and vegetables.
  8. Slice the sweet potato into rounds.
  9. Pour the chicken mixture into a baking dish and top with the sweet potato rounds so that no chicken mixture is exposed.
  10. Brush with olive oil and season the top of the hotpot.
  11. Oven bake for 30-35minutes.
  12. Enjoy!

NUTRITION

Screen Shot 2018-04-02 at 19.09.13.png

Chicken – a low-fat source of protein which is high in the vitamins thiamin, riboflavin and niacin for energy production; and zinc for enzyme function, immune control and protein synthesis.

Sweet Potato – one of your 5-a-day, and a useful source for many vitamins and minerals including: retinol needed for vision, growth, immune function and is a key antioxidant; thiamin for energy production; and vitamin C for protein and neurotransmitter synthesis, detoxification and acts as an antioxidant.

The vegetables chosen will also contribute to your 5-a-day and vitamin and mineral intake. I recommend selecting no less than 2 or 3, however the more the merrier!

Why Christmas dinner isn’t THAT bad for you…

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!!

I hope everyone has had a splendid day full of festive cheer… but lets get onto the eating. At the moment I am sitting watching Alan Carr’s Chatty Man and feeling like a stuffed turkey, and I am sure that I am not the only one eh? Christmas Day is perceived as a nationwide ‘cheat day’, however should we even be considering that the feast of a meal we have all consumed is a ‘cheat meal’? The basics of a Christmas dinner (for the most of us) would be meat, veg and potatoes, and this does conform to, depending on how everything is cooked, the guidelines set out by the NHS in the Eatwell Guide.

MEAT

Okay so you may pass this by if you are veggie/ vegan but, for the majority of us, this is the main staple of a Christmas meal. I have narrowed it down to three main meats consumed in a regular persons dinner:

Turkey

So turkey is a very very very lean meat, with 100g containing 31.2g of protein and only 4.6g of fat. But what does this mean? There are slightly less calories per 100g than a more fatty meat so could be considered a ‘healthier’ option. It is also high in multiple minerals: zinc, which is used in carbohydrate metabolism, protein and fat synthesis and immune function; potassium, needed for nervous and heart function; and phosphorous needed for bone and teeth formation.

Chicken

Turkey’s small but mighty counterpart, many of the same nutritional values are similar to its larger cousin. It is marginally higher in calories per 100g (177 as opposed to 166 in turkey) which can be explained by a slight increase in fat (7.5g) and a decrease in protein (27.3g). SCIENCE FACT: Fat contains 9kcal per gram whereas protein only contains 4kcal per gram. These small differences should really be overlooked, as chicken is still a lean and healthy meat. As well as being high in potassium and phosphorous like turkey, it is also high in niacin (a B vitamin) which help the body use carbohydrates for energy.

Beef

Okay okay okay, so this is a more fatty meat BUT there are some nutritional benefits. Firstly, fat is NOT bad for you, if eaten in moderation, as it is needed for energy, fat-soluble vitamin absorption and organ protection. It also has a high iron content, which is needed for oxygen transport and, out of all the vitamins and minerals, has the highest number of deficiencies in humans.

VEGETABLES

So there is a reason that we all need to have 5-a-day…. because vegetables are one of the key dietary sources of the main vitamins and minerals, and there are LOADS in a Christmas roast!

Brussels

Love them or loath them they are a staple of a Christmas dinner. Nutritionally they are a provider of potassium, folate which helps growth and cell maintenance, and vitamin C which helps make collagen, a protein making up connective tissue, aids hormonal reactions and immune function.

Carrots

Roast carrots drizzled in honey is how my family cook them at Christmas, and we eat them by the ton! Carrots contain a whopping amount of retinol (vitamin A), which has roles in the body associated with growth and immunity.

Parsnips

The cousin of carrots, parsnips don’t contain as much vitamin A, however they can provide us with folate and a massive amount of potassium.

POTATOES

Roasted, mashed, boiled, sautéed, whatever you fancy, potatoes are the starchy carbohydrate staple in your mammoth Christmas meal, providing energy to get you through the charades and boardgames that may follow later on in the evening.

 

SO

The basics of the Christmas dinner are very healthy… so the only unhealthiness on the rest of the day may be the Quality Streets and Christmas pudding consumed throughout the rest of the day…

Continue reading Why Christmas dinner isn’t THAT bad for you…